Major in Economics

The curriculum of the UC Davis bachelor's program in Economics encompasses instruction in deductive reasoning and analysis of models to help understand economic theory, strategies, tactics, policies and consequences. At the same time, students are trained in modern methods of empirical and data analysis that are needed in the business and professional world. The program is intended to teach students how to evaluate existing economics knowledge and how to collect, elaborate and interpret data related to social and business phenomena.

The economics degree at UC Davis is very flexible and well equipped to provide students with first-rate empirical and theoretical foundations as well as exposure to important "real world" challenges. Lower-division preparatory subjects for the Economics major are courses in introductory economics, calculus and statistics. The upper division course work entails a relatively light 44 credits. The four required courses are in intermediate microeconomics, intermediate macroeconomics, analysis of economic data, and economic history. The remaining seven courses can be selected from a wide range of subject areas.

For the minor in Economics, the upper division requires courses in intermediate microeconomics and macroeconomics, and in three elective courses.

While very rigorous in its foundations based on theory, mathematics and statistics, the Economics major and minor are very well grounded in the analysis of the real world of business and economics policy. The topics cover traditional areas of economics as well as newer fields, such as the Economics of East Asia, Psychology and Economics, Poverty, Energy Economics, and Health Economics. For further details, visit Your Time at UC Davis.

Permanent faculty of the Department of Economics teach more than 75 percent of the department's undergraduate classes, while visiting instructors with a Ph.D. teach the remaining courses. Graduate students act as teaching assistants who lead discussion sections.

The department's faculty are very engaged in undergraduate teaching. Professors Robert Feenstra and Alan Taylor are the coauthors of the leading U.S. undergraduate text in International Economics. Professor Colin Cameron is completing an undergraduate text on Analysis of Economics Data that in draft form has been used as a text at UC-Davis for many years. Every year the department sponsors its own Thomas Mayer Award for Distinguished Undergraduate Teaching in Economics. Recent teaching innovations include a new "hybrid" course in which some lectures are online, and face-to-face class time is spent developing in-depth case studies in small groups.

The Department of Economics faculty publish their research in the very top peer-reviewed journals. Additionally, state and federal agencies, national nonprofit organizations, and private sector organizations draw upon the expertise of numerous faculty members. We invite you to learn more about the Department of Economics.